Valley Fever

Valley Fever

What is Valley Fever and how is it transmitted?

Valley fever is shorthand for San Joaquin Valley fever, or coccidioidomycosis. It is caused by several species of Coccidioides fungus. The fungus lives in soil in dry climates (such as California’s San Joaquin Valley), and it can become airborne with dust on dry, windy days or when people are disturbing soil, such as with construction projects, agricultural work, etc. People and animals breathe in the airborne spores, which enter the lungs and can establish an infection.

Climate Change

Extreme weather caused by climate change requires changes in farm management, crop and livestock practices, and farmworker health and safety measures.

Respiratory Health

What is respiratory health?

Agricultural workers are exposed to high levels of air pollution while working outside (e.g. environmental dust, transportation, and/or agricultural practices) and can be exposed to allergens when working in close proximity to animals, such as densely populated dairy or chicken farms.

Valley Fever Awareness: Outdoor Workers at Risk

July 26, 2017
People who work outdoors in California’s Central Valley, especially workers who dig or disturb soil, like agricultural workers, are at risk for Valley Fever.

2014 Strategic Planning Retreat Success

October 03, 2014
The Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety (WCAHS) successfully hosted its 2014 Strategic Planning Retreat last week at UC Davis.